spacerspacer
 
 
spacer
spacer
 
 
 

Haike Rausch and Torsten Grosch have been working together on art projects under the name of 431art for more than ten years. They understand their work as experiencing the phenomena and proceedings of nature, work situations and everyday political - social realities. Through their estrangement of the common view, their gaze on familiar objects breaks the habitual patterns of perception. In so doing; they take away the supposed inherent quality, of being real, from what is considered self-evident.
As prowlers between the different expressions of art, 431art often blurs aesthetic reception. They play with different categories of work often irritates the observer, the spectator experiences estrangement, an inability to classify, a puzzlement of everyday phenomena, experienced now as something new and totally different in the form of an art work. In individual art shows the confrontation between graphic, photographic, film and sonographic elements is for example expressed by oscillating between these various forms of artistic expressions. Graphic art serves alternatively as stand alone pieces, sketches of conceptual works or merely as descriptive panels. This creates a very vivid dialogue with the viewer and the objects on display.
In instances where Grosch and Rausch allow their artistic exploits to be experiment instructions, as seen in the concept for Ripenings, their art is turned into an experiment between science and non-science. Or rather between science and art. In this particular concept they explore the effect musical waves have on the growth of bean sprouts.
This experiment, which likely has its professional sceptics, aims to be a challenge to the logical and rational thought processes, it understands itself to be a provocation to the positivistic methods taken to explain our world. The demarcation line between art and science illustrates the very potential the ephemeral offers; the resounding, the wave, in so doing it sensitizes the observer to a scientific-artistic way of looking at the transient. In this sense the results of this experiment are not only natural science relevant but they also have dual impact as an artis-tic and tactile sensation. This form of aesthetic construction of the non-material is undertaken in I’ll be your substitute whenever you want me – an art project in the virtual space of Second life. In an age where seemingly everything can be digitalized (from human interaction all the way to very private spheres of reality) 431art tackles the way we perceive reality and identity.
The virtual environment combines Plato’s allegory of the cave – the classical western philosophical image, which encapsulates the dilemma, between being and appearance – through the visualisation of labyrinthine formations. The tension between immersion and distance has an epistemological implication for the virtual and the supposedly real plain of perception. The structure of the work itself is a labyrinth, which mixes up various levels of real life representation. The aesthetic interferences between audio, video, the source code of the first Second Life Viewer, the avatar and the observer, sitting at his or her computer, creates a metaphorical field of analysis for the questions of authorship and personality, within an online existence. In this dense matrix the user must grapple, in his quest for a stable identity, with mirror images of himself and his environment. Confronted with a virtual doppelganger and the software created environment the user is directed towards cognition of the entire digital parallel universe.
The site specific installation Lemna Minor, on the other hand is based on natural history interests. On the surface the subject is duckweed, on a deeper level it addresses the ambivalence between useful and harmful. Furthermore it allows natural objects to appear as ‘objets trouvés’, and their naming conventions and observation are turned into instances of aesthetic examination. The collection of different exhibition spaces is a reflection of the conceptual path described by the artist group itself, to make spaces they utilised natural situations as sources for theoretical and creative reflections. On the outside; the observer is met with two floating objects, one of which acts as a window that allows a clear view of the water, in the midst of the overgrowing duckweed and the other is a mirror of the clear sky. Both can be understood equally as instruments of observation or as stand alone sculptural works. Next to this installation is an abandoned laboratory with Petri dishes and descriptive displays, reminiscent of scientific exhibitions. The various objects are freely moving between the different levels of reception, between being a document of artistic claim and being a part of a botanical information-centre. The lines between aesthetic reception on the one hand and acquisition of knowledge on the other are blurred.
With the project Five Elements (Fünf Elemente) 431art confronts the wisdom of world defining sages. The five elements earth, water, fire, air and ether are considered by Indian philosophy to be the basic elements of all visible objects. They are considered as entities, which shape the corporal world in their individual correlation to each other. Analogous to these elements, the Indian chakra teachings have devised a system where man moves from one level of existence to the next. From purely corporal basic necessities (earth) on to the ability to communicate (air) all the way to being a spiritual being (ether).
Five Elements translates this thought construct into a mixed media installation made out of audio, video, text, 3d animation and live performance. Earth, water, fire, air and ether are conveyed in soundscapes of natural sounds, digital sound synthesis, and whispered texts. Occidental philosophy ranging from Apulejus, Parmenides of Elia, Frater Albertus alias Albert Riedel meet texts from Gautama Buddha and excerpts from Chassidim narration. On a large screen and in the stage room in front one can see Haike Rausch performing live everyday actions; such as drinking a glass of water, lighting an incense coil, while the film features figures doing improvised dance moves. Both areas of depiction are so tightly interwoven into the audible space that they complement each other both by contrast and correspondence. Both produce a dynamic composition, which reflects the very dynamics of life – the becoming, the change and the decay – in a manner, which allows new sensual reception and new ways of reflection.
With My Private Supermarket 431art opened a small shop, in the display window a shelf with jam jars was on show. The exhibition room at first glance seems to be a mixture between a modern convenient store and a quaint corner store. However upon closer inspection it becomes obvious that the goods on offer are by no means limited to commodities. On one wall cryptic handwritten texts are projected, show cases featuring butterflies with rather strange costumes of interwoven typographic structures. A video screen shows a bumblebee, as it assi-duously flies from blossom to blossom ticking off it’s shopping list. Even the jars on offer contain everything but ordinary jams. The labels on the jars do not only give information about their contents but additionally allude to the methods and essence in which the contents were harvested:  Happiness-Harvest, Spontaneous-Harvest, Spontaneous Planned Harvest, Coincidentally Saved Harvest, Intuitive Harvest.
My Private Supermarket moves at the same time between various different subject fields. The various exhibits, with their different thematic aspects, cover the length and breath of today’s marketplace with its organic food and to a large extent the lost culture of self-reliance. It picks up on the increased homogenisation of the world of commodities, the loss of small individual shops and finally with the gathering as a leisure activity the means of survival. The strange labels do not, as is common practice, tell of the final product but instead tell the observer about instances of intuition, spontaneity and chance, which have determined the contents of the jars. On a different level of introspection within the institution of art, the question is raised – is there a reciprocal relationship between artefacts that are for sale and if so, what is the relevance of process and experimental projects. Accordingly 431art leaves the exhibition space by unexpectedly accosting the public in the social services office across the road where the only commodities that are not for sale are offered to the visitors in the form of jam-spread bread. Due to this temporary intervention of a kind of non-place, the socially regulated care system is confronted with the unconditional art of giving.
In their exhibition as with many other projects of 431art the ephemeral is stressed – consequently following through the orders of management – by the subsequent closure of the shop. However the finissage is not the beginning of an insolvency case, but rather a catalogue in which all the stores goods are contained which will retrospectively still be available.
Martin Doll, Media critic (catalogue text)

 
Pfeil nach oben

Pfeil nach unten
 

Haike Rausch und Torsten Grosch entwickeln als Künstlerteam 431art seit rund zehn Jahren gemeinsam künstlerische Projekte. Sie begreifen ihre Arbeitsweise als „Abtastungen“ von Phänomenen und Vorgängen, die sie in der Natur, der Sphäre der Arbeit oder allgemein im Politisch-Sozialen vorfinden. Durch situative Verfremdungen des Blicks auf die Gegenstände irritieren sie vertraute Wahr-nehmungsmuster und nehmen so dem scheinbar Selbstverständlichen seine Quasi-Evidenz.
Als Wanderer zwischen verschiedenen Kunstgattungen verwischt 431art dabei auch die Grenze zwischen gewohnten ästhetischen Rezeptionsformen. Ihr überbordendes Spiel mit verschiedenen Werkkategorien verunsichert den Betrachter und lässt ihn das Befremdliche, nicht Klassifizierbare und Rätselhafte alltäglicher Phänomene als Kunst neu und grundsätzlich anders erfahren. In den einzelnen Ausstellungen erhält die Konfrontation von Grafischem, Fotografischem, Filmischem und Sonografischem ihre besondere Kraft beispielsweise durch das verwirrende Oszillieren zwischen verschiedenen Darstellungsmodi. Grafiken etwa fungieren variabel als eigenständige Einzelwerke, als Skizzen der konzeptuellen Vorarbeit oder als erläuternde Hinweistafeln. Dadurch eröffnet sich für den Ausstellungsbesucher ein lebendiger Dialog mit den einzelnen installativen Elementen.
Wenn Grosch und Rausch ihre künstlerischen Erkundungen ohnehin als Versuchs-anordnungen begreifen, lassen sie dieses Konzept in Ripenings explizit als Experiment zwischen dem Wissenschaftlichen und dem Nichtwissenschaftlichen – oder anders gesagt: zwischen Wissenschaft und Kunst – Gestalt annehmen. Sie untersuchen dabei die Auswirkungen von musikalischen Schwingungen auf das Wachstum von Bohnenkeimlingen. Ein solches Fachkreise zwangsläufig skeptisch stimmendes Projekt versteht sich als Herausforderung an das logisch-rational geprägte Denken und problematisiert das damit verbundene positivistische Weltverstehen. An der Demarkationslinie zwischen Naturwissenschaft und Kunst wird dabei das Potential des physisch Flüchtigen und Nichtstofflichen, der Resonanz, der Welle beleuchtet und der Betrachter für eine wissenschaftlich-künstlerische Anschauung des vorderhand Nicht-Wahrnehmbaren sensibilisiert. Insofern sind die Ergebnisse dieses Versuchs nicht nur eine naturwissenschaftliche, sondern auch im doppelten Wortsinne eine künstlerische Sensation.
Diese Form der Ästhetisierung des Nicht-Materiellen ist auch Gegenstand von I'll be your substitute whenever you want me – einer Arbeit, die in der Virtual Reality-Umgebung 'Second Life' realisiert wurde. Im Zeitalter der Digitalisierbar-keit, in dem scheinbar alle alltagsweltlichen Bezüge (von der zwischenmenschlichen Kommunikation bis hin zu privaten Erfahrungsräumen) rechnergestützt prozessierbar geworden sind, macht sich dieses 431art-Projekt zur Aufgabe, vertraute Realitätsbegriffe und Identitätsvorstellungen zu hinterfragen.
Das virtuelle Environment verbindet Platons Höhlengleichnis – bekannt als das abendländisch-philosophische Bild für das Problematisch-Werden von "Sein und Schein" – mit der Visualisierung labyrinthischer Formationen und lässt im Spannungsfeld zwischen Immersion und Distanz die epistemologischen Impli-kationen der Überlagerung von virtuellen und 'realen' Erfahrungsebenen thematisch werden. Die Struktur der Arbeit ist dabei selbst ein Labyrinth, in dem verschiedene Repräsentationsebenen durcheinander gespielt werden. Die ästhetischen Interferenzen zwischen Audio, Video und dem Sourcecode des ersten Second Life-Viewers sowie zwischen dem Avatar und dem Betrachter am heimischen Computer öffnen so ein metaphorisches Deutungsfeld um Fragen nach der Eigenwirklichkeit sowohl von virtuellen Räumen als auch von mit Personalität und Autorschaft verbundenen Online-Existenzen. In dieser undurchdringlichen Matrix wird der User auf seiner umherirrenden Suche nach einer stabilen Identität zugleich mit mehreren Spiegelungen seiner selbst und seiner Umgebung konfrontiert, nämlich mit seinem virtuellen Double, mit der diesem und seiner 'Lebenswelt' zugrunde liegenden Software sowie mit der erkenntnistheoretischen Reflexion des gesamten digitalen Paralleluniversums.
Die site specific-Installation Lemna Minor beruht hingegen auf 'naturkundlichem' Interesse. Die vordergründig um das Thema Wasserlinsen kreisende Arbeit problematisiert nicht nur die Ambivalenz von pflanzenkundlichen Zuschreibungen wie dem Nützlichen und dem Schädlichen, sondern lässt auch die Naturgegen-stände als 'objets trouvés' sowie die Konventionen ihrer Beschreibung und Beob-achtung zum Gegenstand ästhetischer Anschauung werden. Das Ensemble aus mehreren Ausstellungsbereichen zeichnet den konzeptionellen Weg der Künst-lergruppe nach, vorgefundene räumliche und natürliche Gegebenheiten thematisch zu reflektieren und kreativ zu transformieren. Im Außenbereich begegnen dem Betrachter zwei schwimmende Objekte, eines fungiert als Fenster, das zwischen den wuchernden Wasserlinsen einen klaren Blick auf das Wasser freigibt, eines als Spiegel, das den Himmel reflektiert. Beide können variabel als Observationsinstrumente wie auch als eigenständige skulpturale Schwimmkör-per aufgefasst werden. Neben dieser Installation befindet sich ein verwaistes Labor mit Petrischalen und Hinweistafeln, die an naturwissenschaftliche Ausstellungskonzepte erinnern. Die Anmutung der Exponate changiert dabei auf verschiedenen Rezeptionsebenen zwischen Dokumenten des künstlerischen Aneignungsprozesses und Elementen eines botanischen 'info-centers' und lässt im Zusammenspiel der verschiedenen Anschauungen eine distinkte Einteilung in ästhetische Erfahrung einerseits oder Wissensaneignung andererseits unentscheidbar werden.
In Fünf Elemente setzt sich 431art mit Weisen der Welterklärung auseinander. Die fünf Elemente Erde, Wasser, Feuer, Luft und Aether werden in der indischen Philosophie als basale Qualitäten aller sichtbaren Dinge aufgefasst, als Qualitä-ten, die in ihrer jeweiligen Korrelation die Körperwelt bestimmen. In Analogie zu diesen Faktoren beschreibt die indische Chakrenlehre ein System, innerhalb dessen sich der Mensch von Seinsstufe zu Seinsstufe, von den rein körperlichen Grundbedürfnissen (Erde) u.a. über die Fähigkeit zur Kommunikation (Luft) hin zu einem spirituellen Wesen (Äther) weiterentwickelt.
Fünf Elemente überträgt dieses Denkgebäude in eine Mixed Media-Installation aus Audio, Video, Text, 3D-Animation und Live-Performance: Erde, Wasser, Feuer, Luft und Aether werden dabei in Soundscapes aus natürlichen Geräuschen, digitalen Klangsynthesen und geflüsterten Texten transponiert: Abendländische Philosophie von Apulejus, Parmenides von Elea, Frater Albertus alias Albert Riedel treffen auf Texte von Gautama Buddha und Ausschnitte aus den „Erzählungen der Chassidim“. Auf einer Leinwand und dem ihr vorgelagerten Bühnenraum ist Haike Rausch zu sehen: Live werden alltägliche Verrichtungen performt, Wasser wird Schluck für Schluck getrunken, Räucherspiralen werden angezündet, während der Film frei zum Klang improvisierte Tanzfiguren zeigt. Beide Darstellungsebenen sind so mit dem Hörraum verwoben, dass sie sich sowohl kontrastiv als auch korrespondierend ergänzen und zusammen mit dem Akustischen eine Komposition ergeben, die die Dynamiken des Lebens – Werden, Wandlung und Vergehen – sinnlich erfahrbar und neu reflektierbar macht.
Mit My Private Supermarket eröffnet 431art einen kleinen Laden, im Schau-
fenster ein Regal mit Marmeladengläsern. Der Galerieraum erscheint auf den ersten Blick als eine Mischung aus einem modernen Lebensmittelgeschäft und Omas Vorratskammer. Bei genauerem Hinsehen jedoch beschränkt sich die 'Auslage' keineswegs auf eine reine Warenpräsentation: Auf eine Wand sind kryptische handschriftliche Texturen projiziert, Schaukästen beherbergen eine Sammlung von Schmetterlingen mit einer befremdlichen Tracht aus verschachtelten typographischen Strukturen, und ein Videomonitor zeigt eine Hummel, wie sie unterwegs von Blüte zu Blüte beflissen ihren Einkaufszettel abarbeitet. Selbst die scheinbar 'feilgebotenen' Gläser beinhalten alles andere als gewöhnliches 'Eingemachtes'. Die Etiketten geben nämlich nicht nur Auskunft über die Ingre-dienzen, sondern zeichnen sich auch durch eine eigentümliche Klassifikation aus, z. B. Glücks-Ernte, Zufalls-Ernte, Spontan geplante Ernte, Beiläufig gerettete Ernte und Intuitive Ernte.
My Private Supermarket bewegt sich zugleich in mehreren thematischen Feldern. Denn die einzelnen Ausstellungselemente spannen mit je unterschiedlichen Ak-zenten einen thematischen Bogen zwischen der derzeitigen Konjunktur teurer Bio-Feinkost und einer weitgehend verloren gegangenen Kultur der Selbstver-sorgung, zwischen der zunehmenden Homogenisierung der 'Einkaufswelten' und dem Verschwinden kleiner Einzelhandelsgeschäfte und schließlich zwischen dem Sammeln als Freizeitbeschäftigung und als Mittel zur Sicherung des Überlebens. Die ungewöhnlichen Etikettierungen lassen zudem nicht – wie sonst üblich – das Endprodukt, sondern die u.a. durch die Prinzipien der Intui-tion, der Spontaneität und des Zufalls geprägten Vorgänge seiner Hervorbring-ung in den Vordergrund treten. Auf einer anderen Reflexionsebene werden dabei innerhalb der Institution Kunst auch Fragen nach dem Wechselverhältnis zwischen dem Bedarf an verkäuflichen Artefakten und der Relevanz prozesshafter und experimenteller Projekte aufgeworfen. Entsprechend verlässt 431art mit einer Performance die Grenzen des Kunstraums, indem sie den Menschen im Wartesaal des gegenüberliegenden Sozialamts Brote mit den Fruchtaufstrichen der Ausstellung – den einzigen 'Exponaten', die unverkäuflich bleiben – serviert. Durch diese temporäre Intervention wird eine Art 'Nicht-Ort' der gesellschaftlich reglementierten Fürsorge mit Kulturen des bedingungslosen Schenkens, d. h. der Gabe konfrontiert.
Wie bei vielen anderen Projekten von 431art auch wird das Ephemere bzw. Vorübergehende betont und die Ausstellung – konsequent dem Konzept der Geschäftsführung folgend – mit der Aufgabe des Lädchens beendet. Zur Finissage wird jedoch kein Insolvenzverfahren eröffnet, sondern ein Katalog herausgegeben, in dem das 'Inventar' retrospektiv verfügbar bleibt.
Martin Doll, Medienwissenschaftler (Katalogtext)

 
Pfeil nach oben

Pfeil nach unten